News Release

U.S. in Iraq: Big Picture · Election Interference · America’s Blinders · The Logic of Withdrawal

JERRY STARR
Author of The Lessons of the Vietnam War, Starr said today: “The U.S. government is openly manipulating the construction of the Iraqi government. For the past half century, the U.S. has intervened in elections on behalf of candidates and parties considered most responsive to U.S. interests, including Iran and Guatemala in 1954, Vietnam from 1954-73, the Dominican Republic in 1965, and now in the Mideast. It’s difficult to dictate election processes while, at the same time, persuading the larger population that your claims about their future independence are credible.”
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HOWARD ZINN
Available for a limited number of interviews, Zinn wrote the 1967 book Vietnam: The Logic of Withdrawal. He is also author of the bestseller A People’s History of the United States. His most recent piece is “America’s Blinders,” in which he writes: “Now that most Americans no longer believe in the war, now that they no longer trust Bush and his administration, now that the evidence of deception has become overwhelming, we might ask: How come so many people were so easily fooled? … The deeply ingrained belief — no, not from birth but from the educational system and from our culture in general — that the United States is an especially virtuous nation makes us especially vulnerable to government deception.”
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ANTHONY ARNOVE
Arnove is author of the recently-released book Iraq: The Logic of Withdrawal, which has an introduction by Zinn. Arnove wrote recently: “Al-Qaeda made its first appearance in Iraq only after the invasion, a predictable outcome of the U.S. occupation. … Even more circular is the idea that the United States has to stay in Iraq until it ‘defeats’ the resistance to the occupation. The occupation itself is the source of the resistance, a fact that even some of the people responsible for the war have been forced to acknowledge.”
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For more information, contact at the Institute for Public Accuracy:
Sam Husseini, (202) 347-0020; or David Zupan, (541) 484-9167